Caballero en Don Quijote de La Mancho: historia literaria y análisis digital

Introducción  El concepto del caballero es central a la historia de don Quijote por Cervantes porque explica la posición imaginada de don Quijote y porque Cervantes crea un nuevo caballero diferente del estándar pasado de Castilla. Este ensayo explorará las diferencias en los papeles del caballero andante antes de Cervantes, del caballero de don Quijote … Continue reading Caballero en Don Quijote de La Mancho: historia literaria y análisis digital

WOMEN HEADS OF STATE: THE IMPACT OF FAMILY TIES

Abstract Family ties were originally an unspoken requirement for women to attain power. The last decade has seen a slight decline in this trend in Asia, Latin America, and Africa; however, family ties remain a relevant factor for both men and women reaching the highest offices in Asia, Latin America, Africa, and Europe with a … Continue reading WOMEN HEADS OF STATE: THE IMPACT OF FAMILY TIES

Hillary Clinton and Presidential Language Fingerprints

Abstract “Hillary Clinton & Presidential Language” is designed to answer the question: Does Hillary Clinton Speak Presidential? During the current race for the 2016 Presidential Election, Hillary Clinton is one of the candidates with the most experience in politics, yet she fits into a demographic highly criticized within the linguistic community. As a woman, she … Continue reading Hillary Clinton and Presidential Language Fingerprints

James Baldwin’s Twentieth Century America: Linguistic Analysis of Martin Luther King Jr., Malcolm X, Barack Obama and James Baldwin

Abstract The rhetoric of today’s black resistance is rooted in the work of James Baldwin, a mid-twentieth century writer, orator, and poet. Baldwin was influenced by both Malcolm X and Martin Luther King, Jr., and he adopted the moderate realistic discourse in verbal speech that both men had contributed to prior to their assassinations. The … Continue reading James Baldwin’s Twentieth Century America: Linguistic Analysis of Martin Luther King Jr., Malcolm X, Barack Obama and James Baldwin